Salad: Creole Potato Salad with Apple

As you announce the next course, you receive a few sighs or raised eyebrows at the news of a salad. After all, this is Christmas, the day when butter, sugar, and cream make every dish better and the activities don’t end until everyone is passed out in a food coma with sugar plums dancing in their head. But fear not, this potato salad is anything but ordinary with spicy mustard, onions, garlic, and crisp tart Granny Smith Apples. The original recipe didn’t even call for fresh apples, but it was such a unique recipe that we had to try it. We believe every dish is better with fresh fruit and this was no exception. The balance of sweet, crunchy, creamy, and spicy will have your head spinning; a veritable Christmas culinary potpourri. Making the dish is very straight forward, probably the easiest out of all the recipes in the Christmas Feast , especially since you can make this salad hours or even a day in advance and store it in the fridge.

Ingredients

3 pounds red potatoes, scrubbed well and cubed

2 tart apples (we used fresh Granny Smith)

¾ cup mayonnaise

½ Creole mustard

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

1 teaspoon sugar

Salt and freshly ground black pepper

1 small Vidalia onion, chopped

2 stalks celery, chopped

2 cloves garlic, chopped

Directions

Place the cubed potatoes in a large pot of cold salted water. Bring to a boil. Cook potatoes until they are fork tender. Drain in a colander and let cool.

In a small bowl, whisk together mayonnaise, mustard, apple cider vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper.

Once cool, add potatoes to a large bowl. Add chopped onions, celery, and garlic. Pour the dressing over the potatoes and mix well. Season with salt and pepper, if needed.

Makes 6 servings.

Recipe courtesy of foodnetwork.com

The Fruit Company® got its start in 1942 when Roy Webster began selling apples and pears from his orchards located in Hood River, Oregon. The area was perfect for growing fruit thanks to the volcanically enriched soil and glacial water from the nearby Mt. Hood. The fruit was exceptional. The company was passed down from father to son and today is owned and operated by Roy's Grandson Scott Webster.

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