Mountain Biking in the Gorge

by Becky, Operations Manager

A Natural Frame for Mt. Hood

Mt. Hood framed by autumn trees and rocky bluffs.

My husband and I had a great day mountain biking this past weekend. We trucked our bikes and dogs to Horsetheif Lake State Park, east of The Dalles on the Washington side of the Columbia River. The weather was exceptional and we were able to see quite a few deer and a 4-point buck in the rocky meadows and hawks circling overhead. The trail was a single track through tall grass and scrub oak trees and had a couple of hill climbs that overlooked the Columbia River with Mt. Hood in the background. We came across a chestnut tree that had Concord Grapes wrapped all through it, and they were absolutely perfect. It was a good natural sugar burst, not to mention delicious… my immune system surely got a boost from the grape seeds.

Stasha & Trader in Oak Leaves

The dogs loved the deep piles of oak leaves.

Being autumn the leaves of the large scrub oaks are falling, and I couldn’t resist taking a photo of my dogs in the deep leaves. Trader, our 6 year old Samoyed, is in the process of attaining his “Working Title”. He is after all a sled dog and loves to do his job. He carried quite a bit of weight in his pack, not to mention doggie biscuits.

Jack and Trader

My husband and Trader with Oregon across the river.

This year we have taken our dogs on most of our rides….from the 23 mile round trip Deschutes River Trail (twice), to the short 3.8 mile ride we did this past weekend. While mountain biking I have taken over 600 photos just this year of this beautiful part of the country we live in. It’s a new hobby that we’ve all grown to really enjoy, and we live in the perfect place for it.

Me with the dogs

Me with the dogs and Horsetheif Butte, Lake, and a bit of Mt. Hood in the background.

The Fruit Company® got its start in 1942 when Roy Webster began selling apples and pears from his orchards located in Hood River, Oregon. The area was perfect for growing fruit thanks to the volcanically enriched soil and glacial water from the nearby Mt. Hood. The fruit was exceptional. The company was passed down from father to son and today is owned and operated by Roy's Grandson Scott Webster.

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